BAIO – Man Of The World Review


Chris Baio has done a fine job of establishing himself as a solo artist after being the bassist of Vampire Weekend. His album debut The Names received a positive response for its imaginative structures, eccentric lyrics and varied sound. With it, he proved that he is a true purveyor of fine music. His new album was written and co-produced by Chris in Brixton amidst the chaos of 2016; from the death of David Bowie to the great political upheavals that developed throughout the year. This all occurred whilst he was “a nomad” as an American in London and this new album is very much his view of such events. 

‘Philosophy’ is the first single from his new album and is a rhythmic track laden with horn based hooks and loose riffs. The sound he’s created has a greater sense of ease to it and Chris’ measured vocals mirror this to form a slick piece of music. This track has a keen sense of melody and again Chris demonstrates his ability to form hooks from unusual sources. The track marries its lower and higher tones perfectly; the horns play off the jangling riffs and the vocal rounds mirror the high notes against the low. Ringing electronica and crisp percussion bridge the gap between the two and make the progress of the song seamless. ‘DANGEROUE ANAMAL’ is the polar opposite to the light faux funk of ‘Philosophy’ with drooping piano chords, echoed percussiona and an intricate set of electronica meandering in the background. This track is about wing lost and being unable to effect any change on several issues and it being ultimately “too late to change”. It is a dark and thought provoking song that shrouds itself with its music to only heighten the message of the song. ‘Out of Tune’ is a pepped up single with opaque synth chords and cheesy trumpets mirroring the vocals. The song struggles to settle and get into some sort of rhythm though once the song sticks with the chorus, the song begins to make more sense and ends with a flash of coherence.

‘Sensitive Guy’ is more akin to tracks from The Names with its sparse, echoed percussion and spiky piano chords. What sets it apart from that are the sharp riffs overlayed onto the track as well as occasional rumbling bass interludes and backing vocals that are brought to the fore of the track. A track that is familiar, but different enough from his last body of work. The title track is a swagging piece of electronica that has echoes of late Eighties Dance music with blocky, bouncing beats. These are tied with Latin acoustic riffs and heavily churning effects that distort and twist the music at its building conclusion. His spoken lyrics pull the songs focus in and keep the listener on their toes. It is a track that exemplifies his development as a solo musician. The album opens with the sea of distorted chords of ‘Vin Mariani’ which has brass and vocals layered over it. It is a creative foundation from which the rest of the song can do whatever it wants. The remaining tracks including the final two of the album are tracks that feature heavily distorted features that feature some experimentation in fusing them with Pop melodies and hooks. They work in parts and overwhelm the senses in others. These are the only pitfalls of the album; experimentation will naturally produce tracks that don’t work so well and that is the case here with a handful of tracks, but the album as a whole is varied in tone and features a lot of trial and error that had paid off. Baio clearly has an ear for alternative hooks and melodies and he puts them to good use here for what is a natural and substantial evolution to this sound. 

BAIO – Man of the World = 8/10

Owen Riddle

Single Review – BAIO – Philosophy 

Chris Baio is back with a new single ‘Philosophy’ which will be featured on his upcoming second album Man of the World which is expected on June 30th. His debut The Names received a brilliant response for its imaginative structures, eccentric lyrics and varied sound. With it, he proved that he is a true purveyor of fine music. His new album was written and co-produced by Chris in Brixton amidst the chaos of 2016; from the death of David Bowie to the great political upheavals that developed throughout the year. This all occurred whilst he was “a nomad” and this new album is very much his view of such events. ‘Philosophy’ is a rhythmic track laden with horn based hooks and loose riffs. The sound he’s created has a greater sense of ease to it and Chris’ measured vocals mirror this to form a slick piece of music. This track has a keen sense of melody and again Chris demonstrates his ability to form hooks from unusual sources. It all bodes well for what should be a promising second effort from BAIO.

Owen Riddle 

BAIO – The Names Review

With his debut solo effort The Names Chris Baio who has previously been known as the capable bassist of Vampire Weekend to many and as an accomplished DJ to a few more, has the benefit of people not expecting too much from him. With this underestimation as “one of the other guys from Vampire Weekend” is the potential to really highlight his credentials as a musician in his own right and as a talented producer too. His eclectic mix of genres and recording styles are something that is always welcome, but it’s one thing trying and quite another making a great album from such an approach.

The lead single from the album is ‘Sister of Pearl’ which is a rhythmic and organic piece of pop rock with a neat, yet warm continental style with rapid mandolin-like riffs and staccato-like piano chords that bring forth a high pithed harmonisation of the Baio’s vocals with dip in and out of a trembling baritone at one end of the scale to a wistful melodic backing vocal on the other. The track remains simple, slick and direct differences of audible clarity between elements makes those that he wants to stand out make themselves known and make themselves an integral part of the track. With this in mind he let’s the catchy tune continue throughout whilst the faint whirring synths behind lift the song up to it’s concluding peak. A cleverly though out track which is intricately functional, but also fun. ‘Endless Rhythm’ is a track which is evocative of the previous tracks in it’s form and sleek structure with it’s chiming melodies and crisp bass lines. It’s anchored by Chris’ casual and low pitched vocal and it’s stuttered echo which are a solid placement amongst the flowering electronica and those delicate, chiming melodies. What is evident with both of these singles is his song writing ability with simple, but often eccentric lyrical content that sounds familiar until you delve a little deeper.

Upon hearing the title track you begin to detect a hint of consistency as he combines those rhythmic tones with a creative production that has featured in all of his singles in isolation, but here it is combined with a great results. The intermittent, nudging beats paly off the warped, whirring synths as Baio’s skipping vocal goes on to echo on across the instrumentation. With this track he is able to form a delicate and considered dance track using his rhythmic sensibility and his skill behind the controls. ‘Brainwash Yyrr Face’ is a track more akin to Caribou with it’s clicking percussion and controlled bursts of rich, warping and whirring electronica. In this case he utilises vocal samples to generate a tune of spliced parts of a vocal which deliver an Jamie XX style of reaching a peak of sound in the chorus. The verses flanking them are fitted out with Baio’s echoed and light vocal and the track is concluded with a more heavier and bulkier variation of the instrumentation previous with a more flamboyant percussion behind it, ending in a proper dance track manner. ‘Needs’ is a groove filled piece of modern disco met with a hazy, but meandering vocal. The track goes on to turn into an unrelenting guitar anthem before again spilling off into a angular piece of electronica before starting it’s cycle again. A track of poise and purpose. ‘Matter’ is more of an ode to The Pet Shop Boys with the laser-like flashes of electronica meeting a driving dance beat and a low toned, broken down vocal. ‘I Was Born In A Marathon’ offer up Baio’s take on early 90’s techno with an added sense of atmospheric perspective and melody. The other two tracks offer up very different experimental themes, but both ‘All The Idiots’ and ‘Scarlett’ remain intriguing and inviting pieces of music which is the consistency with this album. Beyond that particular consistency, he has moulded a varied and dynamic album of intricate and well thought out tracks that are often very enjoyable to take in and greatly rewarding for the listener. To achieve both of these qualities is far from easy and for a debut album Baio should be commended for it.

BAIO – The Names = 8.5/10

Owen Riddle @oriddleo1995

Single Review – BAIO – The Names

The Vampire Weekend bassist Chris Baio has already excelled himself as a solo artist with the already released singles from his upcoming debut The Names. The three tracks unveiled so far have been dynamic and varied instrumentally, vocally and in terms of structure and production. With the new release in the title track you begin to detect a hint of consistency as he combines those rhythmic tones with a creative production that has featured in all of his singles in isolation, but here it is combined with a great results. The intermittent, nudging beats paly off the warped, whirring synths as Baio’s skipping vocal goes on to echo on across the instrumentation. With this track he is able to form a delicate and considered dance track using his rhythmic sensibility and his skill behind the controls.

Owen Riddle @oriddleo1995

Single Review – Baio – Endless Rhythm

Vampire Weekend’s bassist Chris Baio has embarked on his debut studio album titled The Names and the first two singles from the album ‘Brainwash yyrr Face’ and ‘Sister of Pearl’ both provided intricate and finessed pop tracks. Now he’s released a new track in ‘Endless Rhythm’ which is evocative of the previous tracks in it’s form and sleek structure with it’s chiming melodies and crisp bass lines. It’s anchored by Chris’ casual and low pitched vocal and it’s stuttered echo. It just adds to the anticipation for The Names which is out on September 18th and has the potential to be one of the highlights of the year.

Owen Riddle @oriddleo1995

Vampire Weekend – Modern Vampires of the City Review

Naturally, a lot is expected from Vampire Weekend with the general success of their first two albums from which they have developed slightly to a more sophisticated and thorough approach and sound between them. One thing is also certain. They will get radio time across most stations too and there might be a greater sense of responsibility on their part, to create a more developed and perhaps even innovative sound to all these ‘chart listeners’. Perhaps with Modern Vampires of the City; they have done that. First up to be unveiled was ‘Diane Young’. The song it’s self is just under three minutes of Vampire Weekend upping the anti with the drums, bass, and guitar and synth sections aswell. The only part of the song where you get a breather is in the bridge sections with basic percussion along with Erza Koenig’s manipulated vocals that change the pitch of his voice from high to low. This was done using pitch shifting equipment which is used on other songs on the album. But then Chris Tomson’s drums come tearing their back into the song along with the other instumentals. Perhaps from my description it’s suggested that it’s a bit of a wild mess but they are all pretty talanted musicians and so they have a sense of control with the song that still makes it enjoyable whether sitting down or spinning on your head. The songs energy is it’s key and that’s why it’s a great single. This song is likely to be played to death at some Thursday night Indie Disco too and it will still probably appeal to those half hearted fans who just liked songs like Holiday, Cousins etc.

‘Step’ could not be more different and really acts as a demonstration of their added maturity and sophistication. The song is much more stripped back musically and at a much steadier tempo. Erza’s vocals are more isolated and the song allows him to display his vocal ability. This is accompanied by simple synth chords, basic drums and a very considered bass line which often intercepted at the close of every verse and on the chorus by a harpsichord like sound which has a angelic choir going on in the background which also closes the song. In addition to this the lyrics of Batmanglij and Koenig really take centre stage as well which could often be blurred between nonsense or genius, or even a little of both. It’s been described as Simon and Garfunkel on acid or something and this actually sums ‘Step’ up pretty well. Similarly ‘Ya Hey’ is of a similar tempo and feel to ‘Step’ with very similar choir like elements and basic drum and bass sections, while the synths take a back seat. ‘Ya Hey’ does include a victorian style piano solo on the bridge but continues throughout the latter half of the song as a rythm indicator. The song includes the more extensive use of the pitch shifting with the high pitched ‘Ya Hey’s’ in the chrous which is quite broken up and then leads to Erza’s vocals taking centre stage again and acting as hook with it’s slight anthemic and ‘sing-a-long’ quality.

Other songs include ‘Unbelievers’ which is driven by an organ sound along with a basic rythm section along with complimentry backing vocals that provide a great little harmony that provides the song with it’s hook. ‘Worship You’ at times on the chrous has the same quality to it that Simon and Garfunkel’s ‘The Boxer’ which was recorded in the spire section of a church. But it’s intercepted at intervals by Erza’s rapid paced vocals and generally the song it’s self is pretty up tempo. ‘Hudson’ has shades of an experimental song about it with the angelic choir sound making another appearance but to this time to add a real eerie atmosphere. The candenced march of the drums and the dull tones of the synths add to it and again shows how the band have developed since 2010. The album was produced with Ariel Rechtshaid who has worked with the likes of Bieber to Haim so knows how to polish a record until you can use it as a mirror. The band have certainly tried a few different methods too with the pitch shifting which was also used on the drums and the guitar was recorded straight onto the recording programme while various drifferent recording techniques were used to ‘soften’ the album and make it listenable. They have certainly done that and while being very carefully produced, it also has a slight edge to it as well and therefore results in their best album yet. They have grown older and their music has grown with it to create a very unique at times and mature sound. Batmanglij also suggested that “We thought these three albums should look like they belong together on a bookshelf.” But all three albums work together as stand-alone records too but this may be a signal for a more radical approach for the fourth album either lyrically or musically but you’ll just have to wait on that one. Die hard fans may have to adapt slightly, half hearted fans might not be interested and those who haven’t listened to them might like them for the first time but in general it’s their best album yet and the future looks promising as Vampire Weekend establish themselves as accomplished and dynamic musicians.

Vampire Weekend – Modern Vampires of the City = 8.5/10

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