Sunday Suggestion – Au Revoir Simone – Crazy

Au Revoir Simone are a New York group consisting of Erika Forster, Annie Hart and Heather D’Angelo and last year they released Move In Spectrums. It was an album full of sweet and unashamed pop with more intricate melodies and lyrical dimensions that kept us all ‘warm and fuzzy’ in the darkening and colder nights of the Autumn it was released into. One track which best carries out it’s task is the single ‘Crazy’, which I reviewed a year ago to this day.  There are more ‘traditional’ instrumentals in this song compared to their usual synth heavy efforts. The deep bass line along with the whirring riffs around it, allows for them to be placed thinly on top of it all and gives the song real light and shade. The percussion offers up a sturdy rhythm which lets everything else churn out the melody. The vocals have their own echo and have a subtle rise and fall with each line and they’re smooth and easily sounded out above the music. This song is a great piece of synth-pop fused with lo-fi tinged, indie melodies and chord progressions. The lyrics are simple and catchy too.

Au Revoir Simone – Move In Spectrums Review

Brooklyn dream and synth pop trio Au Revoir Simone return with a follow-up to their 2009 album Still Night Still Light and their latest single, ‘Crazy’ while keeping rooted in their electronic sound; had suggested greater use of traditional instruments with their album. Apart from that you can expect the capable and dreamy vocals with less than typical melodies and something that’s pulled together with a tinge of innocence with both the vocals and instrumentals. Erika Forster, Annie Hart and Heather D’Angelo are now pretty experienced and capable musicians now. They’ve proved that and have been given the credit so there’s not so much pressure on them now and are free to do what they like if they choose to do so. Move In Spectrums is an opportunity to flex their muscles if you like and really refine their sound further.

There’s much more ‘traditional’ instrumentals in this song compared to their usual synth heavy efforts. The deep bass line along with the whirring riffs around it, allows for the synths to placed thinly on top of it all and gives the song real light and shade. The percussion gives out a great rhythm which lets everything else churn out the melody. The vocals have their own echo and have a subtle rise and fall with each line. They’re smooth and easily sounded out above the music. This song is a great piece of synth-pop fused with lo-fi tinged, indie melodies and chord progressions. The lyrics are simple and catchy too and promotes a structure that can allow for more stripped back sections, pauses, instrumentals and sugar-coated harmonies. Its innocent yet refined. Catchy yet considered. A sophisticated pop tune. ‘Somebody Who’ opens with the mis-matched 80’s percussion and the light drone of a synth while the soft and delicate vocals sit atop the thin sound being created. It creates much space and scope for extra synth chords to have a bigger effect and makes it easy for the shifts in tone which takes place before building up to the song’s conclusion in a steady manner. It’s a subtle yet suggestive song that seems to convey a sense of style by the limits on this song that’s created an atmospheric sound that they can easily manipulate and add to, but yet again they’ve done it in a minimalistic fashion with the extra synth sounds and vocal harmonies and have instead placed them in prime positions.

‘We Both Know’ starts with a steady drum machine beat that’s softened by its own distortion which is more lighter in tone. The build-up of sound then includes a churning reverb of a piano and a distorted lead guitar riff that breaks through the other sounds just about. However, all the sounds all merge together nicely and create a sombre and down beat narrative. All of this without the use of vocals. When they do arrive they, like the instrumentals repeating around them; they are echoed and spaced out and maintain the emotion being conveyed by the instrumentals are don’t spoil the songs steady flow. The patchwork instrumental structure of ‘The Lead Is Galloping’ is done with the varying percussion. Both traditional and automated. The choruses are made the focal point with the synths plugging the melody and lead out to spaced out and reverbed sections. The vocal is clear and had that similar clarity and straight-forward appearance but leads off towards the end of the song to echo and reverb like the synths bouncing around the end of the song.  ‘Gravitron’ is a bold piece of synth pop with a clear dance beat that’s utilised in an imaginative and melodic way. ‘Boiling Point’ is a wistful and floating with its instrumentals that are being reverbed to create a washed out sound. This gives the vocals a certain freedom which they utilise to maintain to washed out feel of the song. They fuse the vocals and instrumentals together with ease yet can present them as individual elements and this gives them so much scope to enhance a sound or to alter it which they do pretty well. This result’s in a sophisticated piece of synth pop that is accommodated further by the addition of traditional musical elements. They’ve even achieved a contrast between straight up dreamy and simple moments as opposed to spaced out and considered moments throughout the track listing as well. It is not a surprise to see that they’ve done that as they’re clearly capable of it and is well worth a look.

Au Revoir Simone – Move In Spectrums = 8/10

Images from neumos.com / prettymuchamazing.com

 

Single Review – Au Revoir Simone – Crazy

Keeping with New York; there is a new single from Brooklyn trio: Au Revoir Simone. For those who don’t know that’s Erika Forster, Annie Hart and Heather D’Angelo. Their last album: Still Night Still Light was released back in 2009 so there’s a bit of expectation about their upcoming effort: Move In Spectrums and one of the singles off that is ‘Crazy’. There’s much more ‘traditional’ instrumentals in this song compared to their usual synth heavy efforts. The deep bass line along with the whirring riffs around it, allows for the synths to placed thinly on top of it all and gives the song real light and shade. The percussion is gives out a great rhythm which lets everything else churn out the melody. The vocals have their own echo and have a subtle rise and fall with each line. They’re smooth and easily sounded out above the music. This song is a great piece of synth-pop fused with lo-fi tinged, indie melodies and chord progressions. The lyrics are simple and catchy too. Move In Spectrums looks like a bright and happy album to keep everyone warm and cheerful as the nights grow darker. It’s out on September 23rd.

http://youtu.be/zp052xQ-BsQ

Image from fanart.tv