Arcade Fire – Everything Now Review 


‘Everything Now’ is the fifth studio album by Canadian group Arcade Fire. The album is rather more experimental than their last outing, however that does not necessarily mean that they all land. A friend recently described this to me as a “marmite” album, you either like it or you don’t. Maybe I’m odd, but that wasn’t my experience with Arcade Fire’s most recent album, with it coming across to me as an awkwardly average outing by the band, with only a few songs on the album actually being of any interest.​Firstly, let’s talk positives. Both ‘Infinite Content’ and the follow-up ‘Infinite_Content’ are both good outings, with them contrasting each other well, whilst being about the exact same thing. ‘Infinite Content’ is one of the heavier songs on the album, providing thrashing guitars and genuine “head-banging” tunes. It provides a good addition to the dance album that the band appeared to be going for, having a very different sound to songs like of ‘Everything Now’. Contrastingly ‘Infinite_Content’ is a much slower tune, and whilst not being one that you can dance to, it works really well in context. The song lyrics “All your money is already spent on infinite content” fits perfectly with the tune, which to me sounds like the sort of music you would hear inside a shopping mall; calm and upbeat. Out of the singles, both ‘Electric Blue’ and ‘Creature Comfort’ are both fine musical additions. ‘Electric Blue’ is a well produced, quite funky track with an appropriate level of synths that certainly add to the melodic beat. The vocals too are particularly noteworthy, with a falsetto being deployed masterfully in this song. ‘Creature Comfort’ similarly deploys synths brilliantly, creating an 80s-style dance track that is surely enjoyable.

​However, the positives in this album are slightly overshadowed by the negatives. Whilst there are good songs on the album, this album also contains possibly one of the worst songs I have heard this year. ‘Chemistry’ is a basic and lazy addition to the album, it is only memorable by the fact that it is quite dire. The song has a basic marching beat in the background over lyrics sang with little experimentation. The bland nature of the song may work well if the song were a short melody in the album, but at 3:38, it is almost inexcusable. Whilst the album as a whole is experimental, with both hits and misses, it feels like ‘Chemistry’ was produced with next to no effort, which is a shame as we know that Arcade Fire can do so much better than this. ‘Good God Damn’ is alright, but has very little to grip you for an extra listen. Which brings me onto another issue with the album, when it comes at the end, the latter songs on the album are completely forgettable after listening. Both ‘We Don’t Deserve Love’ and ‘Put Your Money On Me’ are instantly forgettable, both have very low-key beats that do not remain with the listener afterwards. And we have seen much better perfomances when it comes to vocals.

​’Everything Now’ does have some stand-out examples of why the experimentalism here was not a waste. There are some songs on the album that are definitely worth adding to your playlist. However, a lot of the album is disappointing. When the band has gone out to create someting a bit more experimental and dance-worthy, it is almost unforgivable just how dull some of the music is. Hardly any of it will be played in your local bar or nightclub, I even doubt there will be many people tapping their foot in the comfort of their own home. What doesn’t help is that a lot of the album is “just alright.” But there is gold to be found here, just not a lot of it.

Arcade Fire – Everything Now – 5/10

Matthew Johnston

Single Review – Arcade Fire – Signs of Life 

Whether Arcade Fire find themselves rooted in rousing rock or pushing into newer, more mechanical material, they never seem to reduce the theatricality. New single Signs of Life dabbles in this, but in comparison to what we’re used to, tones down the drama. The track is built upon a funky bass, surrounded by various horns, siren effects, clapping, etc, etc, which adds up to make a colourful number recalling quintessential 80sness. Win Butler’s talkative tone paired with the mellow funk catches a likeness to Pet Shop Boys numbers. Despite its fun, Signs of Life lacks conviction, with diverse instrumentalism being chucked in here and there, nothing ever making a truly coherent breakthrough. For me, its completeness as a track is questionable. But there is no doubting the entertaining undertones the electronics have delivered. And hey, it’s Arcade Fire – they’re Canadian national treasures and should be protected at all costs.
Eleanor Chivers

Single Review – Arcade Fire – Everything Now

Everything now is Arcade Fires’ new single that precedes the Canadian band’s new album with the same name, which will be released july 28th. At the beginning you will be surprised by a melody which reminded me of ABBA, which is amazing. I wasn’t sure what I was hearing to be honest, but it’s so happy and uplifting and it brings the band back to the bands style in their 2013 album ‘Reflektor’. There’s only a hint of melancholy there. Adding the flute to this song with a weird techno intro that turns into that cacophony and then into this whole other beat and feel.

Everything now gives you the feeling of a band that is in control of their sound and it displays incredibly imaginative and wonderful songwriting. They found their balance, and if they manage not to lose it we can expect an amazing new album.
Lea Fabbrini 

This Weeks Music Video with Foo Fighters, Lana Del Rey feat. The Weeknd, Arcade Fire, Liam Gallagher, Metallica, Radiohead and MØ