Single Review – Florence and the Machine – Sky Full of Song

Cast your mind back to 2015, and the familiar vocal of Florence Welch was roaring the lyrics to the thunderous What Kind of Man; the lead single to her band’s third album. Now, three years later, and we find ourselves in a similar position, gifted with another release from Florence and the Machine…although this one is much, much different. Their latest release – Sky Full of Song – is a soft, acoustic number, punctuated by bass and with little other instrumental addition. Welch’s voice glides over the track, discussing painstaking lyrics of doubt and the stress of her industry. The atmospheric single isn’t perhaps as exciting as some of their arena-filling past material, but it is interesting to hear Florence’s ghostly voice pushed in a different direction, perhaps signposting a new style for the British band’s fourth LP.

Ellie Chivers

Musicandotherthingz.com Best Single of 2015

Here is the list of fifteen nominees for Best Single

 

3. Florence + The Machine – Queen of Peace (13%)

With a track that had a bracing energy and theatrical feel flowing through it, ‘Queen of Peace’ demonstrated Florence’s vocals at their best and the teetering anticipation of each verse is met with the euphoric chorus. On top of this is simply a solid beat and steady rhythm to form a great single.

 

2. Brandon Flowers – Can’t Deny My Love (17%)

The Killers frontman provided us with some shameless self indulgence with his second solo album The Desired Effect and it came no less shameless than with ‘Can’t Deny My Love’. The track is Peter Gabriel meets A-ha musically, but Brandon makes it his own with one the best vocal performances of his career. It’s rhythmic hooks, punch and sing-a-long quality make it worthy of its position.

 

  1. Tame Impala – Let It Happen (20%)

The fact that a song at almost eight minutes long has won this category is just testament to Kevin Parker and his band-mates musical ability for they keep you engaged for the whole length of the track. As the first release of July’s Currents, the band made a big statement as to their philosophical shift and it doesn’t remain in the same place for long. The song takes various forms from catchy to trancelike as you travel along its journey and what a journey it is.

Musicandotherthingz.com Best Vocalist of 2015

Here’s the list of ten nominees for Best Vocalist of 2015.

 

3. Kwabs (15%)

London’s Kwabs has certainly made a mark that’s arguably bigger internationally than it is domestically, but nevertheless the UK is gradually coming to it’s senses as to his talent. He is instantly recognisable for his deep Baritone vocal and it seems to have endless power behind it for him to sustain that tone effortlessly. Not only that, but he can apply his vocal to the Pop of ‘Walk’ or to the Power Ballad of ‘Forgiven’ as well as the slow piano tunes and Soul tracks on his debut album Love +War. A Great vocal talent that can only get better.

 

2. Matt Bellamy – Muse (19%)

It is difficult to have a category on Vocal performance without mentioning Matt Bellamy of Muse. His large vocal range as a Tenor is a rarity in the Rock world and he often uses it to maximum effect as he did again with Muse’s seventh studio album Drones in June. The musical power and weight of the bands sound rests on Matt’s ability to be heard above it all and shouldn’t be underestimated.

 

  1. Florence Welch – Florence + The Machine (23%)

An unsurprising top spot for Florence Welch who is able to convey a wide variety of tones and her entire vocal range is just one song, never mind a whole album. Even the whispered backing vocals of St.Jude are full of energy and her ability to gradually build up her vocal over a sustained period deserves commending. There’s more to being a vocalist than just power, Florence has that, but she can rapidly alter her sound to different forms which makes her greater still.

Florence + The Machine – How Big, How Blue, How Beautiful Review

How Big, How Blue, How Beautiful is Florence + The Machine’s third studio album. The first two efforts had been solid to advanced and there was obviously a lot of talent within them, but there is certainly potential for more and there is no better time to do so than by your third album. Florence Welch is known for combining emotive lyrics with a passionate and emotional delivery, but here the danger lies in losing that as a sound or idea is reworked as it is set to be with this album. If she can maintain her core strengths whilst adding a little dynamism to her catalogue of songs then it will be a great success, if not then it’ll be a pretty decent effort nonetheless.

‘What Kind of Man’ features vocals that open the track in perfect isolation until the song takes a sudden, low slung rock turn with bursts of grinding riffs and a stomp-like percussion. These slip in and out between more smooth transitions led by her vocals and are given an enthused drama and grandeur. It’s not a wondrous track, but it is certainly one that is produced and arranged very effectively to still set up Florence for a fiery delivery of quite fiery lyrics. ‘Ship to Wreck’ is a little more laid back in it’s emotion and a little more mellow in it’s delivery with it’s lapping acoustic riffs and sweeping lead guitar elements with the tambourine shimmer behind it. The song is still very direct and engaging as a nice Pop-Rock track, but without Florence and her vocals you’d probably let this song pass you by. In this sense it’s perhaps a little too over-reliant on her vocals and could have been so much more instrumentally, but a direct song either way. ‘St Jude’ is a song that’s contemplative and subtle with it’s lightly whirring vocals and the echoed vocals sat in front of them. The song remains intimate and is beautifully arranged and delivered with the most gentle shifts in sound and showcases the lyrics of searching and being lost within yourself and is perhaps more revealing that it initially seems. Add to this a wonderful, trembling vocal and it’s a effortless, soft ballad.

‘Delilah’ highlights a more driven and direct with an even greater focus on her vocal capabilities in their subtle isolation. With this track, the instrumentation builds up around it and accommodates it at every point as it builds and dissolves in volume. Once the song finds it’s rhythm it remains sharp and simple with a crispness and steadiness; a solid foundation for Florence to demonstrate her vocal ability. This track and indeed the album seems to be focused upon her vocals via the simple hooks or more atmospheric and minimalistic tracks and if you’re going to focus on any vocal, Florence’s aren’t going to lose your attention. A track that did with ‘Ship to Wreck’ could have done. The title track is a song with a muted, nudging rhythm from the rich organ sounds, but progresses into a track that features a pretty dull instrumentation that not even Florence’s vocals can inject life into. ‘Queen of Peace’ is more akin to the singles ‘Delilah’ and ‘Ship to Wreck’ whilst ‘Various Storms and Saint’s and ‘Long and Lost’ are just two more sparse tracks with Florence’s vocal the only point of interest. With this we discover the problem of the album. It relies too much on the vocal delivery instead of adding to it and this puts an even greater focus on the lyrics which simply weren’t as good as they have been previously. Having said that, it’s still an album of a high standard in that it isn’t weak in any place, just not as strong as it could have been.

Florence + The Machine – How Big, How Blue, How Beautiful = 7.5/10

Owen Riddle @oriddleo1995

Single Review – Florence and the Machine – Delilah

Florence Welch has released one of the last singles off Florence and the Machine’s upcoming third album How Big, How Blue, How Beautiful which is released on June 1st. ‘Delilah’ along with the previous singles off the album, highlight a more driven and direct approach this time around with an even greater focus on her vocal capabilities in their subtle isolation. With this track, the instrumentation builds up around it and accommodates it at every point as it builds and dissolves in volume. Once the song finds it’s rhythm it remains sharp and simple with a crispness and steadiness; a solid foundation for Florence to demonstrate her vocal ability. This track and indeed the album seems to be focused upon her vocals via the simple hooks or more atmospheric and minimalistic tracks and if you’re going to focus on any vocal, Florence’s aren’t going to lose your attention.

Owen Riddle @oriddleo1995

Single Review – Florence + The Machine – What Kind of Man

Florence and the machine return to announce their first studio album since 2011’s Ceremonials with their third LP How Big, How Blue, How Beautiful which will arrive at the very start of June. The first two efforts have been solid to advanced and there’s obviously a lot of talent within them, but there is certainly potential for more and there is no better time to do so than by your third album. The title track is a strung out and faded track with rising and falling orchestral sections that feature rather grand brass elements in what is a dramatic and well formed track. ‘What Kind of Man’ features more vocals and they begin the track in perfect isolation until the song takes a sudden, low slung rock turn with bursts of grinding riffs and a stomp-like percussion. These slip in and out between more smooth transitions led by her vocals and are given an enthused drama and grandeur. It’s not a wondrous track, but it is certainly one that is produced and arranged very effectively and is promising of the album to come.