Single Review – Foo Fighters – Run

It has been two years since one of the worlds biggest bands released material with their St. Cecilia EP in 2015 and another year since their last album Sonic Highways from 2014. Their new single ‘Run’ took some people by surprise though people have been expecting some new material and is likely to form part of an upcoming ninth studio album. It opens with those echoed, ringing riffs before a pacing percussion signals the start of a rabid and snarling piece of hard rock. From Dave Grohl’s screeches to the wiry lead riffs ahead of the grinding rhythms, the song kicks and screams and kicks hard. In an instant, they have the ability to turn melodic with echoed harmonies, backing vocals and Dave’s typically easy tunefulness. It is not going to be the best track you’ll hear this year, but the Foo Fighters have typically delivered a high octane track with added aggression whilst retaining the ability for melody amongst the heavy sounds. 

Owen Riddle

EP Review – Foo Fighters – Saint Cecilia

The legends that are the Foo Fighters only go on to further their on-going perception as the nicest band around with their new free five track EP. St Cecilia is named after the hotel in Austin, Texas that they recorded these five tracks at and the Saint is the patron saint of musicians of course. The band also dedicated the EP to the victims of the Paris attacks, something which Dave Grohl’s friend Josh Homme was caught up in at the Bataclan theatre that night.

 

The EP in general is the band at their classic best with euphoric song progressions and heavyweight melodies and this is demonstrated best on the title track. The track swings from the rhythmic hooks of the chorus to the bulkier sections of the verses where the guitars are given a more free reign. Dave and Taylor Hawkins team up again for their trademark harmonies that run through the whole track to complete a optimistic piece of music. ‘Sean’ is a track echoing their earlier, rapid sound with an added kick behind it. ‘Savoir Breath’ is a keen play on words and is a track bordering on Heavy Metal which the band relishes in as we’ve seen in their documentary album Sonic Highways from last year. ‘Iron Rooster’ provides a change of pace in a more simple acoustic setting for a more considered and reflective track with Grohl’s vocals accompanied by a neatly places riffs and piano chords. ‘The Neverending Sigh’ is brilliant piece of unrestricted hard rock music with the riffs hitting peak after peak and the rhythm unrelenting in it’s pace.

 

For a free EP, Saint Cecilia is well worth getting your hands on as the Foo Fighters deliver some nuggets of their classic sound and indulge in a few variations too.

 

 

Owen Riddle @oriddleo1995

Foo Fighters – Sonic Highways Review

Foo Fighters

The Foo Fighters have now unveiled what they, themselves have hailed as their most ambitious album yet with their eighth studio album Sonic Highways that has seen them travel across the United States to the cornerstones of American music and culture that has not only been documented in the album, but in the form of a HBO documentary with a plethora of guests, opinions and of course locations from which they recorded each particular track. This is enough expenditure and talk to get even a band as established as the Foo Fighters under a bit of pressure upon the album’s release; pressure that’s even truer given the success of the 2011’s Wasting Light, but have they lived up to the promise and promotion?

They start off with Chicago in ‘Something From Nothing’. The tracks opens with a lapping and slightly distorted riff and Grohl’s slightly muted and broken up vocal. It then sets about a step by step build up in sound with the clear and crisp vocals, the whining lead riffs, percussion and bolder, scathing rhythms. At the same time, the song’s rhythms starts to accelerate before being ushered in by Dave’s trademark furious scream into a pit of raging and flashing rhythms, bass lines and lead parts along with a now pounding percussion. It’s a great tribute to the scale of the Foo Fighters, brought to bear in one track. Not a huge divergence, but the story to the track and whole album is indelible and it’s the Foo Fighters at their best; setting you up slowly and hitting you with a musical sucker punch. ‘The Feast and The Famine’  focuses upon the musical legacy and identity of Washington D.C as opposed to Chicago with last week’s single ‘Something From Nothing’ and opens up another, more familiar version of the band. The previous single offered up the band’s full repertoire of scale, volume and aggression on a gradual and enticing gradient; from the lapping riffs to the shredding guitars. ‘The Feast and The Famine’ is more directly evocative of their 1997 album The Colour and The Shape with it’s ringing riffs which are soon turned into churning and raging cacophony that fixates upon the rest of the track. Grohl delivers his classic scream and rapid lyrical out put. A dramatic and theatrical vocal unison pulls the song away from the intensity, before throwing itself back in there like only the Foo Fighters do. Not as skilful as the previous single, but certainly with the same level as enjoyment if not intricacy.

‘Outside’ opens in a muted and whirring fashion before crashing into life with the well lit riffs and percussion as it trails back off into a more gentle, lapping rhythm along with a slightly distorted vocal from Grohl. The track is then opened up with a sharp and cutting lead riff that gives the song a sense of purpose if not difference. It then goes on to fade off into a more open ended and atmospheric sound with the riffs echoing into the song’s new found spaciousness before another stab at it.’In The Clear’ opens in an intermittent, choppy fashion with carry on in an industrious fashion with some nice melodies filling over the Grohl’s calmer vocals and the soaring backing vocals. ‘Congregation’ is a track that is directed by the lead meandering through the track that has a rattling and smooth progression about it, but the track seems to lack urgency and as a result is a little flat and well worn. Tracks like ‘I am a River’ are more gracious and considered affairs to start off with. The whirring synths and gently humming guitars all echo back into each other as riffs gradually start to emerged from the flashing guitars to be met with a melodic and soft vocal from Dave.song continues on the gradual build up in sound with each verse into the chorus that ups the feel a little, yet controls it throughout for a song that has a nice sing a long quality and a slightly infectious feel even if it is nothing you haven’t heard before. On the whole the album does fall down in a lot of places and the promise of the ‘Something From Nothing’ is gradually diminished throughout. If Sonic Highways is to have a lasting legacy, it will come in the form of the excellent documentary that accompanies this album. Beyond that, this album rarely gives you anything to get excited and invigorated about.

Foo Fighters – Sonic Highways = 6.5/10

Single Review – Foo Fighters – The Feast and The Famine

Foo Fighters

The Foo Fighters make a quick-fire follow up of their initial single from their upcoming album Sonic Highways with ‘The Feast and The Famine’. This track focuses upon the musical legacy and identity of Washington D.C as opposed to Chicago with last week’s single ‘Something From Nothing’ and opens up another, more familiar version of the band. The previous single offered up the band’s full repertoire of scale, volume and aggression on a gradual and enticing gradient; from the lapping riffs to the shredding guitars. ‘The Feast and The Famine’ is more directly evocative of their 1997 album The Colour and The Shape with it’s ringing riffs which are soon turned into churning and raging cacophony that fixates upon the rest of the track. Grohl delivers his classic scream and rapid lyrical out put. A dramatic and theatrical vocal unison pulls the song away from the intensity, before throwing itself back in there like only the Foo Fighters do. Not as skilful as the previous single, but certainly with the same level as enjoyment if not intricacy. The accompanying documentary airs for the first time in the U.K tonight at 10pm on BBC4.

Single Review – Foo Fighters – Something From Nothing

Foo Fighters
Rock heavyweights, the Foo Fighters have released the first single to arrive from their upcoming eighth studio album Sonic Highways and they as they pay homage to the cornerstones of American music identity, they start off with Chicago in ‘Something From Nothing’. The tracks opens with a lapping and slightly distorted riff and Grohl’s slightly muted and broken up vocal. It then sets about a step by step build up in sound with the clear and crisp vocals, the whining lead riffs, percussion and bolder, scathing rhythms. At the same time, the song’s rhythms starts to accelerate before being ushered in by Dave’s trademark furious scream into a pit of raging and flashing rhythms, bass lines and lead parts along with a now pounding percussion. It’s a great tribute to the scale of the Foo Fighters, brought to bear in one track. Not a huge divergence, but the story to the track and whole album is indelible and it’s the Foo Fighters at their best; setting you up slowly and hitting you with a musical sucker punch. Their HBO series that’s running alongside the album is underway in the states and will start on BBC Four on October 26th

The Foo Fighters – Sonic Highways Album Taster

The Foo Fighters are set to make a return with their eighth studio album on November 10th with Sonic Highways; an album which Dave Grohl has marked out as making 2014 a big year for the band and also talking of how “this album is instantly recognizable as a Foo Fighters record, but there’s something deeper and more musical to it.” This would suggest a change of method or approach and it becomes pretty clear where this lies. Location. For this, the band have recorded eight track from eight different cites:  Austin, Chicago, L.A, Nashville, New Orleans, New York, Seattle and Washington DC. They have looked to take influence from each of the cities they recorded in and the important cultural figures from there. The album also runs alongside a HBO series of the same name and it see’s them travelling around these cities and immersing themselves in the cultures of each. It even see’s Grohl sit down for a chat with Obama about these musical cornerstones of the United States. We can still expect a snarling, in your face record from them; akin to the classic trademark that is their sound. This time however, we have these new elements entering the music either in lyrical, production or musical fashion. That is what will make this album stand out a bit more than their other as each has always had sizeable attention. Watch this space…